From the Archives

New in the Archives: The Edward T. Steiniger Collection

Dennis Riley 2 days, 1 hour ago
Lance Corporal Edward Steiniger is third from the left Lance Corporal Edward Steiniger is third from the left

We recently posted a finding aid online to the Edward Steiniger Collection.  Like most of the personal collections donated to the archives, this is a small but important addition to the materials entrusted to our care.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

New in the Archives: The Joseph F. Rogers Collection

Dennis Riley 3 weeks, 2 days ago
Illustration for a 40mm mount Mk1 anti-aircraft gun, Ordnance Pamphlet 821 Illustration for a 40mm mount Mk1 anti-aircraft gun, Ordnance Pamphlet 821

The archives recently received a collection of material that adds to our understanding of the important work undertaken at the Yard when it was a Federal shipbuilding facility.  This latest addition consists of nine bound manuals related to Joseph F. Rogers' work as a machinist in the Ordnance Shop.  Five manuals deal with the construction, operation, and maintenance of a variety of anti-aircraft guns, while four others are Navy training courses for Fire Controlmen and Electronic Technician’s Mate.  Also included is a marine engineer’s manual.  The collection also includes a framed New York Daily News newspaper from the Yard’s closure, dated June 19, 1966 and the tool box and some tools used by Rogers. The toolbox and tools are a most welcome addition to our collection, especially considering the fact that they travelled to and from the Yard for nearly 20 years. In a sense they have returned home.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

New in the Archives: The William J. Yager Papers

Dennis Riley 1 month ago
William Yager receives Beneficial Suggestion Award, 1951 William Yager receives Beneficial Suggestion Award, 1951

The archives received an impressive collection of materials donated by William Yager who worked at the Brooklyn Navy Yard from 1947 until 1965.  During World War II he served in the U.S. Army and was first hired at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on July 11, 1947 as a Welder Apprentice and later promoted to Welder Combination. During his 30-plus years of employment he received several promotions to Shop Analyst and Scheduler (Welder Combination), Shop Analyst and Scheduler (Welder), and Shop Planner (Welder). In 1963, Mr. Yager received a promotion to Industrial Engineering Technician in the Production Department, a position he held until the Yard’s closure.  In this capacity he was responsible for establishing methods and standards of doing various shipbuilding jobs.  Outside of his official duties, Mr. Yager was active in the Yard’s gun club.  In 1965, as part of the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s reduction in force, Mr. Yager transferred to the Puget Sound Shipyard for the remainder of his career.  Since then he has lived in Bremerton, Washington.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

New in the Archives: The Louis H. Kaplan Papers

Dennis Riley 1 month, 2 weeks ago
Photograph of the Machinery Division, 1913.  Louis Kaplan is third from the left. Photograph of the Machinery Division, 1913. Louis Kaplan is third from the left.

Louis H. Kaplan was born on September 29, 1893 and was first hired at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on January 13, 1912.  Originally hired as a typewriter, he was promoted to a clerk in 1916.  During World War I he enlisted in the U.S. Naval Reserve on August 8, 1918 and was discharged from the service on March 2, 1919.  After his military service, Kaplan resumed working at the Yard as a clerk.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

New in the Archives: The Mike DeLucia Collection

Dennis Riley 2 months, 1 week ago
Plaque from the U.S.S. Constellation (CV-64) removed upon its decommissioning in 2003 Plaque from the U.S.S. Constellation (CV-64) removed upon its decommissioning in 2003

As we reflect on the 54th anniversary of the U.S.S. Constellation (CV-64) fire, the archives recently received an important addition to its collections related to the tragedy.  Donated by Mike DeLucia, this collection includes nineteen photographs related to the fire aboard the ship that claimed the lives of 49 ship workers.  For more information, see the collection finding aid.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

Home for Christmas

Meredith Wisner 2 years, 2 months ago

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

In Remembrance of Archives Past

Meredith Wisner 2 years, 6 months ago
Drafting Room, Building 5, August 1, 1940 Drafting Room, Building 5, August 1, 1940

This photo is one of my favorites. Depicted is the Yard’s drafting department hunched over their desks busily insuring my future job security. The film’s extended exposure captures their movements – a happy accident that gives the photo an urgency felt across the whole Yard at this time. Taken on August 1st 1940, this image tells the human scale story of the US Navy hurrying to modernizing its infrastructure for its eventual entry in WWII. What was the remainder of all this activity? The answer is tens of thousands of maps and plans that detail the Yard’s largest expansion - a weighty bulk of a collection that I currently manage.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

A Father's Day Remembered

Meredith Wisner 2 years, 8 months ago
Fatherly Pride: Anapolis bound Nicholas LaDuca Jr. and Andrew Zagayko are honored by Admiral Schuyler Neilson Pyne for their soon-to-be midshipmen status as their fathers look on. Fatherly Pride: Anapolis bound Nicholas LaDuca Jr. and Andrew Zagayko are honored by Admiral Schuyler Neilson Pyne for their soon-to-be midshipmen status as their fathers look on.

For Father's Day we found this charming little story of two Navy Yard employees whose sons earned acceptance into the Naval Academy in Annapolis.  Their graduation fittingly took place on Father's Day 1962, and both proud papas were fortunate enough to have been in attendance. We just loved the tone of the story, and how the editorial staff of the Shipworker seemed just as enthusiastic about the young mens' achievements. The story speaks eloquently of the family atmosphere that characterizes Navy Yard throughout its history.

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

The HMS Jersey, is she or isn't she?

Meredith Wisner 2 years, 9 months ago
The HMS Jersey, Illustration courtesy of the New York Public Library The HMS Jersey, Illustration courtesy of the New York Public Library

It is thought that approximately 11,000 Continental soldiers died in the British prison ships moored in Wallabout Bay. The most notorious of these ships was the HMS Jersey. Known colloquially as "Hell," the Jersey became the subject of a number of first-hand accounts telling of the horrific conditions and punishing treatment wrought by the British. Philip Freneau, a prisoner himself, relayed his experience in a collection of poems published around 1780.  An excerpt of one of his more famous poems is transcribed below (and more here).  

Continue Reading >
From the Archives

Howard Zinn, Author, Activist, Basketball Star!

Meredith Wisner 2 years, 9 months ago
Howard Zinn (top right), posing with his fellow Apprentice Association teammates Howard Zinn (top right), posing with his fellow Apprentice Association teammates

Through a serendipitous perusal of the Navy Yard's Shipworker, I found the above image of a dashing Howard Zinn posing after his basketball team’s victory in a Navy Yard tournament. What’s particularly profound about this discovery is that Zinn shared a story about this very team in an oral history he gave on December 8th, 2008. We’re always excited to find visual evidence of the stories our narrators tell, and given the significance of Howard Zinn’s life and his vivid account of the formation of this team, this discovery is all the more poignant. Here’s the full article for your reading enjoyment:

Continue Reading >